Fort Bend Cares hires new executive director

By Joe Southern
jsouthern@fortbendstar.com

Angel Tapia was hired in June as the new executive director of the nonprofit foundation Fort Bend Cares. (Photo by Joe Southern)

When Angel Tapia was hired as the new executive director of Fort Bend Cares in June, the first thing she did was revise the nonprofit organization’s logo.

She added the words “for kids” to better clarify the charitable foundation’s purpose.

Tapia, 37, is a native of the Dominican Republic who grew up in California and moved to Texas in 2007. She resides in Katy with her two daughters, Celeste and Daysha. In addition to her position with Fort Bend Cares, she also owns her own production company, One Halo Productions.

Tapia replaces Angie Wierzbicki, who left last spring to become the executive director of the Cullinan Park Conservancy. Tapia’s job is to raise money to fund grants for other nonprofit organizations that provide services for children in need.

“This gives me the opportunity to create collaborative relationships in Fort Bend County between nonprofits and businesses,” she said.

Fort Bend Cares Board Chair Christopher Breaux said Tapia is the perfect fit for the foundation.

“As part of our continuing mission to provide our community non-profits with resources to meet the needs of disadvantaged children, the board felt Angel’s enthusiasm, experience and empathy for our kids, our volunteers and our community made her a perfect fit,” he said.

“When you have made up your mind that there are a lot of great organizations out there, each doing what they can to help these youth have access to a better quality of life, you realize there is not a better person than Angel Tapia at reaching out and connecting the dots to make that happen. We are excited about the opportunity to serve with Angel in her new role.”

Tapia is all about networking and collaboration. She has a business degree, 15 years of experience working with nonprofits and a background in event management.

“Spanish is my first language,” she said in flawless English.

Her family moved to California when she was 8 years old.

“They thought I was an African-American with a learning disability,” she said.

She was an exceptionally bright student but was put into special education classes until someone realized she had a language barrier, not a learning disability.

“When they put me in ESL (English as a second language), all the dots connected,” she said.

Now she spends her time connecting dots, or rather people to needs. Part of her job is building relationships with businesses, individuals and other foundations in order to raise money for grants. The other part is growing relationships with nonprofit organizations in need of the grants they award each June.

Operating much in the same way as the United Way, Fort Bend Cares carefully vets each grantee to make sure funds are used for direct services to benefit children and not used to cover administrative or operating costs.

Because of her diverse background, Tapia has become an expert at networking and relationship building.

“I’m known as the M&M Lady,” she said.

She attaches small packages of the chocolate candy to her businesses cards to remind people of mission and motivation.

When asked what attracted her to the position at Fort Bend Cares, she said it was a perfect fit for her skill set.

“We’re raising awareness of a lot of different causes as well as building an image of cooperation,” she said.

To learn more about Fort Bend Cares, visit fortbendcares.org.

She was an exceptionally bright student but was put into special education classes until someone realized she had a language barrier, not a learning disability.

“When they put me in ESL (English as a second language), all the dots connected,” she said.

Now she spends her time connecting dots, or rather people to needs. Part of her job is building relationships with businesses, individuals and other foundations in order to raise money for grants. The other part is growing relationships with nonprofit organizations in need of the grants they award each June.

Operating much in the same way as the United Way, Fort Bend Cares carefully vets each grantee to make sure funds are used for direct services to benefit children and not used to cover administrative or operating costs.

Because of her diverse background, Tapia has become an expert at networking and relationship building.

“I’m known as the M&M Lady,” she said.

She attaches small packages of the chocolate candy to her businesses cards to remind people of mission and motivation.

When asked what attracted her to the position at Fort Bend Cares, she said it was a perfect fit for her skill set.

“We’re raising awareness of a lot of different causes as well as building an image of cooperation,” she said.

To learn more about Fort Bend Cares, visit fortbendcares.org.

 

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Search Archive

Search by Date
Search by Category
Search with Google
Log in | Copyright © 2016 by Fortbendstar.com | All rights reserved.