Tree removal part of Community Center Renovation Project

(Submitted photo) These Bradford pear trees were cut down as part of the Phase II Renovation Plan for the Missouri City Community Center.

(Submitted photo)
These Bradford pear trees were cut down as part of the Phase II Renovation Plan for the Missouri City Community Center.

Recently, the Missouri City Parks and Recreation Department removed trees from the courtyard area of the Community Center in the City Hall Complex, 1522 Texas Pkwy.

The tree removal is consistent with the Phase II Renovation Plan for the facility. Phase II of the Community Center Renovation Project may include a new roof over the Community Center (excluding the barrel vault), acoustic panels and emergency lights, as well as landscaping and the installation of new playground equipment, in order to offer a beautiful, fun, and enjoyable civic center to citizens.

During a landscaping assessment with the parks department, it was determined that the existing trees, Bradford pears, have reached the end of their life expectancy.

Typically, Bradford pear trees live anywhere from 15 to 25 years, and the Bradford pears in front of the Community Center were planted almost 24 years ago.

(Submitted photo) This rendering shows the Phase II Renovation Plan for the Missouri City Community Center.

(Submitted photo)
This rendering shows the Phase II Renovation Plan for the Missouri City Community Center.

At full growth capacity, the Bradford pear trees allow no sunlight through the canopy, and as a result, no grass has been able to grow.

The determination was made to utilize in-house resources to remove the trees as opposed to hiring an outside source, in an effort to reduce expenditures.

“Phase II renovation is a priority, and we hope to have the landscaping and all components of the remodeling complete in Spring 2017,” City Manager Anthony Snipes said. “The landscaping design concept provides the perspective of having an open courtyard.

Trees will be installed, and the plan is to work with Parks to identify and plant a tree species that will best suit the needs of the community – trees that do not present a safety hazard, have a longer life span, and are low maintenance.”

Comments are closed

Search Archive

Search by Date
Search by Category
Search with Google
Log in | Copyright © 2016 by Fortbendstar.com | All rights reserved.