Wildlife Center of Texas needs help helping flooded wildlife

Oyster Creek is a virtual lake Wednesday, June 1, 2016, as viewed from the 3400 Block of Oyster Cove Drive. The creek has over flowed its bank and is the highest is has ever been.

Oyster Creek is a virtual lake Wednesday, June 1, 2016, as viewed from the 3400 Block of Oyster Cove Drive. The creek has over flowed its bank and is the highest is has ever been.

The death toll continues to rise as Texas’ relentless floods claim more lives, both human and animal.

Native wildlife are struggling to keep their heads above water. Immediate distress calls are pouring in to The Wildlife Center of Texas to help animals trapped in rushing flood waters.

Just as human families are being forced from their homes, these historic floods are also impacting wildlife. The dangerous currents are leaving babies stranded and mothers drowned. The floods are disproportionately affecting baby deer. Many rescuers are finding fawns treading water and suffering from severe exhaustion.

With almost 5,000 patients already admitted this year, the victims from the seemingly ceaseless floods are having a significant impact on the center’s resources and dedicated staff.

With every natural disaster, the community steps up to the plate. To make a donation to support the center’s life-saving work, visit www.wildlifecenteroftexas.org/donate/.

The Wildlife Center of Texas is one of the largest wildlife hospitals in the nation, servicing a nine-county area. Centrally located in Houston, WCT is the area’s only lifeline for all injured, orphaned, ill, and oiled native wildlife. It admits over 10,000 patients every year; with injuries ranging from being struck by vehicles, gunshot wounds, caught in oil spills, and power line electrocution.

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