Rodeo Art 2

Pictured are "Moo!" from The WIDE School's Ryan Kuo and "United Ambition" from Stafford High School's Justin Amomoy. Both pieces were selected to go to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo's school art auction. (Photos from Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo)

Stafford High School sophomore Justin Amomoy has long been in awe of the school artwork he’s seen displayed for auction at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo.

This year, Amomoy is going to (virtually) be a part of the same display he’s always admired.

Justin Amomoy

Justin Amomoy

“I remember growing up looking at the rodeo auctions, and I used to just marvel at them because it was a different level,” he said.

Amomoy is one of a number of Fort Bend County students whose artwork is up for auction in a competition for the honor of HLSR’s Grand Champion. Fifth-grader Ryan Kuo of the WIDE School in Missouri City is also preparing for auction after his piece entitled “Moo!” was selected.

Kuo’s piece will go to auction Sunday, April 11 after it was named Best in Show on Jan. 28.

“I was very surprised to find out that I won,” Kuo said. “I was very happy because my hard work got recognized but at the same time, I was very sad because I won’t be able to keep my artwork when it goes to auction.”

Amomoy and Kuo are guaranteed to make at least $1,500 from auction, and could win as much as $38,000 if chosen as Grand Champion.

HLSR said on its website that its annual art program promotes an awareness of agriculture, western heritage and show activities through artistic competitions for area students. Artwork is divided into seven categories: colored drawing, mixed media, monochromatic, painting, 3D, elementary and junior high.

Amomoy, who has grown up in a family of drawers and artists, said he had been entering the contest at various levels since middle school. This is the first time, however, that his artwork has made it to this level of the competition.

“I was just shocked that I was in it – I entered the competition mainly just to test my skill level,” he said. “I wasn’t expecting it to make it auction ever.”

But his art teacher, Tammy Bui, was not surprised that Amomoy became the first SMSD student to have artwork reach HLSR’s auction.

"Every year I see the selected pieces and I know our students' work is that good, too,” Bui said in a news release.

Rodeo Art

Pictured are "Moo!" from The WIDE School's Ryan Kuo and "United Ambition" from Stafford High School's Justin Amomoy. Both pieces were selected to go to the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo's school art auction. (Photos from Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo)

Kuo of The WIDE School also is seeing the fruits of his labor. His monochromatic cow painting, he said, had no elegant meaning behind it, but was fun to draw.

“I like cows, because they’re hard to draw, and I really wanted to challenge myself,” Kuo said. “I’ve always liked bulls and the minotaur and things like that. … I like the creativity of art, I like the colors that are flowing and moving. I like how the piece expresses yourself when you draw it and how emotional it is.”

The WIDE School is a private school in Missouri City and has served Fort Bend-area communities since 2001. Creative Director Marjon Aucoin, who runs the school with her sister, said having a student place in the rodeo’s prestigious competition was among the best moments in the school’s competition history.

“Some of these pieces they’ve worked on for months,” she said. “You’re teaching them now that working hard can affect anything – not just art.”

Their hard work appears to be paying off for Amomoy and Kuo, who both deflected praise. They said their favorite part of the rodeo art competition is seeing how it’s ending up.

“I’m honored – there are no words I could say, really,” Amomoy said. “I feel like there were so many before me who deserved this title. I want to continue making records and history.”

HLSR said on its website that its annual art program promotes an awareness of agriculture, western heritage and show activities through artistic competitions for area students. Artwork is divided into seven categories: colored drawing, mixed media, monochromatic, painting, 3D, elementary and junior high.

Amomoy, who has grown up in a family of drawers and artists, said he had been entering the contest at various levels since middle school. This is the first time, however, that his artwork has made it to this level of the competition.

“I was just shocked that I was in it – I entered the competition mainly just to test my skill level,” he said. “I wasn’t expecting it to make it auction ever.”

But his art teacher, Tammy Bui, was not surprised that Amomoy became the first SMSD student to have artwork reach HLSR’s auction.

"Every year I see the selected pieces and I know our students' work is that good, too,” Bui said in a news release.

Kuo of The WIDE School also is seeing the fruits of his labor. His monochromatic cow painting, he said, had no elegant meaning behind it, but was fun to draw.

Ryan Kuo

Ryan Kuo

“I like cows, because they’re hard to draw, and I really wanted to challenge myself,” Kuo said. “I’ve always liked bulls and the minotaur and things like that. … I like the creativity of art, I like the colors that are flowing and moving. I like how the piece expresses yourself when you draw it and how emotional it is.”

The WIDE School is a private school in Missouri City and has served Fort Bend-area communities since 2001. Creative Director Marjon Aucoin, who runs the school with her sister, said having a student place in the rodeo’s prestigious competition was among the best moments in the school’s competition history.

“Some of these pieces they’ve worked on for months,” she said. “You’re teaching them now that working hard can affect anything – not just art.”

Their hard work appears to be paying off for Amomoy and Kuo, who both deflected praise. They said their favorite part of the rodeo art competition is seeing how it’s ending up.

“I’m honored – there are no words I could say, really,” Amomoy said. “I feel like there were so many before me who deserved this title. I want to continue making records and history.”

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